When working in the industrial industry, particularly in the manufacturing sector, you must handle various types of machinery and the parts that go along with it. There can be a variety of different nuts, bolts, and screws that pertain exclusively to certain parts. The hydraulic system is a perfect example of how complex the work is, as there are many different types of thread forms and sealing methods involved. Thread forms can be particularly difficult as they not immediately distinguishable from one another, thus making it difficult when doing modifications or repairs. To help ease your work, read the article below on how to use the process of elimination to identify a hydraulic hose fitting.

The first step is to determine the type of fitting. There are two types of hydraulic hose fittings: permanent and reusable. The former includes crimped hydraulic fittings and are mostly used in the fluid power industry because they are easier to attach than if you use reusable fittings. To connect a crimped fitting, you will need swaging or crimping materials. These fittings are squeezed onto the hose at assembly and are discarded when the hose assembly fails. With the latter, they are not commonly used as most people in the industry consider them much too old and more expensive. They are, however, easily identifiable because they can fit into a hose during assembly with just the use of a vise and a wrench.

After you’ve identified whether your fitting is permanent or reusable, you next need to identify the port and and connectors in the system. For example, NPT/NPTF can go with the 37° Flare and the BSPT (JIS-PT) goes with the 30° Flare (Metric). Following this, you would next identify the sealing method to determine if the hydraulic fitting is an O-ring, a mated angle or a tapered thread. From this point, you would then need to observe the fitting designs and use a seat gauge to determine seat angle.

The very last step in the process would be to measure the thread diameter of the largest point  with a caliper. Refer to a thread gauge to determine the number of threads per inch. You can ensure an accurate reading when you compare gauge and coupling threads against a lit background.

At ASAP NSN Hub, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapnsnhub.com or call us at +1-920-785-6790.


Read more »


If you look at the wings of an aircraft, sometimes you will see small thin wicks protruding from the outermost edge. These are called the static wicks of the aircraft, which are sometimes known as the static discharge wicks. These are a high electrical release device that have a lower corona voltage than that of the surrounding aircraft vessel. These static aircraft wicks were designed to dissipate the static electricity that builds up during each flight.

Aircraft wicks serve a very important purpose which is why it’s just as important to check them often and maintain them. But it’s also crucial that you understand more about the wicks themselves so that you can appreciate why it’s necessary to maintain them. When planes fly through snow, fog, dust, or ash, they are flying through uncharged particles. When negative charges attach to the airframe and positive charges deflect the particles build up and are eventually discharged at places along the airframe where the wicks are stationed at. Were it not for these wicks, there would be audio disturbances, potential loss of communication and weak radio transmissions.

As important as they are, static wicks can still be purchased without authorization of the FAA. There are some planes that can fly without them entirely. This is usually because the planes that do not use them tend not to fly through such uncharged particles. However it is always better to come prepared, which is why major commercial airlines will always carry and maintain static wicks. If you are interested in purchasing electronic controller parts, aviation plug connectors or other items, contact the team today.

At ASAP NSN Hub, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapnsnhub.com or call us at 1-920-785-6790.


Read more »


An aircraft wick, commonly known as static wicks or static discharge wicks, is a high electrical resistance device with a lower corona voltage than the surrounding aircraft structure. Physically, they look like long thin extensions that are located outboard trailing edges of the wings. Their purpose is to dissipate the static electricity that can accumulate during flight. Because they serve an important purpose, it’s extra crucial to take good care of the wicks.

To elaborate more on this, you have to first understand what exactly the aircraft wick is and what it does. As you fly through areas of uncharged particles, which can exist in the atmosphere as rain, snow, fog, dust or ash, positive charges deflect and negative charges attach to the airframe, building up and eventually discharging at certain points of the airframe where the static wicks are generally attached. If these wicks were not in place, there would be potential for audio disturbances, weak radio transmissions and even complete loss of communication. Other possible indications of static discharge include erratic instrument readouts, erroneous magnetic compass readings and a phenomenon called St. Elmo’s Fire, where the static discharge is visible.

The interesting thing about static wicks is that they can be purchased with or without FAA approval. Some planes can even fly without them. While they serve a very important purpose of dissipating static particles, some planes get on without them because these planes simply do not fly through such heavy amounts of particles (ie fog, snow, rain, etc.). However, like in most examples, it is always better to err on the side of caution. All commercial planes will have some form of static wick in the case that the do have a need for them in flight.

At ASAP NSN Hub, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapnsnhub.com or call us at 1-920-785-6790.


Read more »


The rudder is one of the most important control surfaces used to direct a ship, boat, submarine, aircraft, or any other vehicle that moves through air or water. The rudder is an important component in ensuring safe flight, preventing unwanted roll and yaw as well as uncontrolled banking. Mastering rudder control will make you a better pilot and give you the tools to control your aircraft through inclement conditions.

The rudder is flight control surface mounted on an aircraft’s vertical stabilizer or fin that regulates rotation along the vertical axis of an aircraft. This vertical movement is referred to as yaw, and controlling yaw is the primary purpose of the rudder. This is unlike a boat, where the rudder is used to steer the vessel.

In the majority of aircraft, the rudder is controlled by rudder pedals on the flight deck which are connected to the rudder itself. Force applied on a rudder pedal will cause a corresponding movement of the rudder in the same direction. Therefore, pressing the right rudder pedal will cause the rudder to deflect to the right. This will then cause the aircraft’s vertical axis to rotate and move the nose of the aircraft rightward. This can cause a great deal of stress on a rudder, so larger and high performance aircraft will be fitted with hydraulic actuators to help the rudder withstand these extreme conditions.

As aircraft speed increases, so too will rudder performance. At lower speeds, significant rudder input is required to yield noticeable results. Inversely, at higher speeds smaller rudder movements have significant effect. This can create problems, so many sophisticated aircraft will limit their rudder’s movement when the aircraft exceeds maneuvering speed to prevent sudden changes in direction that cause serious structural damage to the aircraft.

At ASAP NSN Hub, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the rudder components for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. For a quick and competitive quote, call us at 1-920-785-6790 or send us an email at sales@asapnsnhub.com.


Read more »


If you have been on an aircraft flight before, you may know that passenger cabins can get very chilly or even very stuffy and hot depending on the flight. With one simple twist of the overhead fan, air conditioning (A/C) can make your ride much more of a pleasant experience. But how does this seemingly simple solution to our flight comfort actually work?

Aircraft air conditioning is supplied by air that is processed through two packs that work to regulate airflow and temperature as required. Despite there being many types of aircraft, the air conditioning system principles and operations remain the same. A/C packs are often located near the main landing gear of the plane on the left and right wings and remove excessive heat using bleed air that enters the packs from the aircraft bleed air system, supplying air to cabins at the desired temperature. The A/C system is based on an ACM (Air Cycle Machine) cooling device and is often called the “Pack”, or air conditioning package.

The aircraft pneumatic system is supplied by bleed air tap-offs on each engine compressor section and supplies the air cycle conditioning system. The bleed air is then directed from the pneumatic manifold into the primary heat exchanger of the packs. This bleed air is cycled through the primary exchanger where ram air removes some of the heat before it is compressed and enters the secondary heat exchanger to continue the cooling process. Cross flow of ram air continues to remove heat before the air moves into the ACM turbine inlet.

After leaving the secondary heat exchanger, bleed air moves through the hot side of the reheater for a first time before being cooled down using colder air from the condenser. The bleed air temperature is increased as it passes through the reheater a second time before moving into the turbine section. By increasing the temperature in the pack, the efficiency of the turbine is also increased. The ACM works to decrease the air temperature by expanding it through a turbine.

As the air leaves the turbine, it passes through the colder side of the condenser, decreasing the temperature of the air to a point below the dew point which turns the vapor into a liquid. Moving from the turbine into the water extractor, moisture is removed and goes to the water spray nozzles which sprays the water into the ram air duct. This works to cool the ram air stream, increasing the cooling efficiency by evaporation.

The passenger cabins are supplied with conditioned air from the mix manifold as the air moves through rise ducts and the side walls before exiting through the overhead distribution duct. The flight cabin is given conditioned air from the left pack and mix manifold, or the right pack if the left is not functioning. 50 percent of the cabin air is recycled for ventilation purposes by recirculation systems that use two fans to move air from the passenger compartment into the mix manifold.

At ASAP NSN Hub, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find the aircraft air conditioning system parts you need and more, new or obsolete. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapnsnhub.com or call us at +1-920-785-6790.


Read more »


An aircraft heating system is integral for safe operation of an aircraft. In the duration of its flight cycle, an aircraft will encounter volatile temperature changes and a heating system can help ensure all aircraft components maintain their necessary temperature for efficient and reliable operation. Two heating systems that are frequently utilized in aviation are exhaust heaters and combustion heaters. The systems share one similarity— both utilize the heating of ambient air, or ram air. Let’s take a look at how these heater systems work.

Exhaust heaters are most commonly seen on smaller, single-engine aircraft. The unit is installed around part of the engine’s exhaust system and is sometimes referred to as an exhaust shroud heater. An exhaust manifold delivers warm exhaust into the metal shroud. Ram air is also brought into the shroud from outside of the aircraft. The air is warmed by the exhaust, then routed through a heater valve to the cabin. In some models, the air is routed to the carburetor as well. Exhaust is then transferred to an outlet.

This type of heater doesn’t need an independent electrical system or engine power to operate, making it efficient in a small aircraft. However, this system is hazardous in the event of failures or defects within its hardware— a small crack in the shroud or exhaust manifold has the potential to leak lethal levels of carbon monoxide into the cabin. This system requires rigorous maintenance efforts to keep it operating safely.

Combustion heaters are seen on various aircraft sizes. A combustion system operates independently from the engine, and only relies on engine fuel from the main fuel system. The system incorporates a ventilating air system, fuel system, and ignition system to heat various components of an aircraft. In order to heat incoming air from the ventilating system, the combustion unit integrates an independent combustion system within a shroud in a heater unit, where fuel and air are mixed and ignited within an inner chamber.

Air intended for combustion is provided by a blower, which pulls air from outside the aircraft and ensures the air is pressurized to the correct specifications. Ram air is collected when the aircraft is grounded, through a ventilating air fan. The ram air is circulated around the combustion chamber and outer shroud, allowing it to heat through convection. Following this process, the heated air is then directed to the cabin. Exhaust from the same process is expelled from the aircraft.

A combustion unit is extremely versatile, which is why it is used on a variety of aircraft. Most are controlled and monitored by a pilot through a cabin heat switch and thermostat and incorporate various redundant safety features. These might include an overheat switch or duct limit.

As is recommended for any other aircraft system, it is important to follow aircraft manufacturer instructions and protocols in the maintenance of exhaust or combustion heaters.  Maintenance guidelines should specify intervals between maintenance and operational checks and should be stringently adhered to in order to ensure safe operation of an aircraft heating system.

At ASAP NSN Hub, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find the exhaust heating system parts, spark plug parts, and aircraft heating systems parts you’re looking for, new or obsolete. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@asapnsnhub.com or call us at +1-920-785-6790.


Read more »


Recent Twitter Posts

 Semiconductor's Certifications and Memberships

We’Re Glad You Visited today.

Please Consider Us the Next Time You’re Searching for Competitive Prices On NSN Parts.

Request for Quote